The Mitsubishi Debonair AMG Is an Unusual Japanese-German Mashup

The Mitsubishi Debonair V 3000 Royal AMG is a real AMG—a really different AMG, too. A global blend of Teutonic tuning and Japanese luxury, it may have been the perfect expression of its moment in time. And the epitome of what Japan aspired to be—a builder of world-class luxury automobiles to rival the European elite. And what better way to do that than wrap one of your top offerings in the mystique of a celebrated German tuner?

In 1987, when this AMG-ified Mitsubishi debuted, Japan was thriving. The Bubble Economy, as it’s known, meant automakers were absolutely flush with cash and happy to spend it developing moonshot cars like the Eunos (Mazda) Cosmo, the Acura NSX, the sequential-turbocharged monsters like the Toyota Supra and Mazda RX-7.

A generation beyond the devastation of WWII and the struggle to rebuild, the Japanese public were also

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Porsche Vision 920 Envisions a Road-Going Replacement to the 919

For four years, the Porsche 919 Hybrid competed in the LMP1 class at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Porsche, however, pulled the plug on the three-time Le Mans-winning racer following the 2017 season and instead focused its racing efforts elsewhere (such as Formula E). The 919 Evo, free of racing restrictions, set some records and made some headlines, but that wasn’t the end of Porsche design’s ambitions for the 919. Not only did Porsche designers work on a street iteration of the 919, but the team also envisioned an informal replacement for it—a preview, perhaps, of a future racer. 

Dubbed the Vision 920, this low-slung Porsche explored a concept for an exotic supercar for the streets, or a racing vehicle for privateers. In other words, you’re looking at Porsche’s thinking about what a theoretical challenger to forthcoming vehicles such as the

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Mercedes-Benz C-Class: History, Generations, Specifications

Mercedes-Benz C-Class Essential History

The Mercedes-Benz C-Class, also known by its internal code name, W201, rolled onto the American car scene in late 1993 as a 1994 model, replacing the 190E (W201) as Mercedes’ compact car. The rear-drive C-Class was initially offered in 147-horsepower, four-cylinder C220 and 194-hp straight-six C280 variants, with the numbers denoting engine displacement (i.e. 2.2 and 2.8 liters). The 268-hp C36 AMG model joined the lineup for 1995; at the time, the C36s were converted—engine and all—from factory-built C280s.

The year 1997 saw a torquier 2.3-liter engine for the entry model, now called C230, while the C36 was bumped to 276 hp and got a fifth cog for its automatic transmission. The AMG model was cut for ’98, but C280s got a new 194-hp V-6, and the five-speed automatic spread throughout the line. For ’99, Mercedes addressed the C230’s sluggish acceleration by supercharging the engine, raising

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Porsche 904 Living Legend Is a VW XL1 With a Ducati Motorcycle Engine

Imagine a 1.2-liter Ducati L-twin, screaming its desmodromic song just inches behind your head—spinning to 11,000 rpm, pushing something like 200 hp, and propelling your beautiful little carbon-fiber Porsche, which weighs a hair under a ton, through space. It’s a minimalist’s fantasy, the notion of a sports car reliant on a lack of weight rather than an abundance of horsepower to achieve remarkable performance. That’s a large part of the spirit of Porsche, and it was distilled into the 2013 904 Living Legend concept. The car was light, lithe, and striking.

For the first decade and a half of Porsche’s existence, all of the company’s products fully embraced this philosophy. We think of Lotus as epitomizing the emphasis on weight reduction, but Porsche’s early reliance on small, low-output flat-four engines meant that its competition success hinged on ever-greater reductions in mass in the early 356 racers and later in cars

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Porsche Vision Race Service Is the EV Van of Our Dreams

You are looking at the Vision Race Service, a vehicle as delectably awesome as its name is lame. Created by Porsche’s design team and built as a full-scale mockup in 2018, a real one of these would fit up to six people inside its sleek, Star Trek shuttlecraft-shaped body and, according to Porsche, slot into the family garage next to, say, a 911 or 718 Boxster.

But this concept’s livery also nods to vans in Porsche’s past, namely the Volkswagen T1—that’s the Microbus—cargo vans and pickup trucks prominently used in the 1960s and ’70s as dealership parts shuttles and race-team support vehicles. The Renndeinst lettering on this concept’s flanks translates to “Race Service,” because of course, and is applied just below a debossed Porsche wordmark. Other cool elements include the gorgeous pewter-colored 22-inch wheels (wrapped in Continental ContiSportContact 6 rubber), aerodynamic vanes ahead of the

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